Getting Paid - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon who wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 25

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

On this episode Jeff welcomes Matthew Twetten, MBA, a health policy expert in physician payment and coding, to talk about financial wellness and being properly reimbursed for MORE of the work we do.

Our time is a valuable commodity. To make the most of our time, it's important to educate ourselves on the rules and processes of billing and coding. This may require additional work and better communication (with the insurance company, patient and billing department), but it will pay dividends in the end.

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Matt offers three steps to improve your ability to get paid and receive proper compensation:

  • Step 1 - Have a mindset that you deserve and need to get paid, to be sustainable

  • Step 2 - Assign a value to yourself and your time

  • Step 3 - While staff can track your time, you need to set your value and set the standard

Most importantly, start seeing your value and capturing your time this week!

If you’re not familiar with Matthew Twetten, MBA, he is a health policy and physician payment / coding professional. He has served in the government relations department of the North American Spine Society (NASS) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). He is currently an independent RUC and CPT consultant to several medical specialty societies and various stakeholders.

Email Team@SurgeonMasters.com if you would like to contact Matt. 

Getting paid is a perfect example of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.

Humanitarian Work - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon who wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 24

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

On this episode Jeff welcomes Dr. Todd Swenning who tells us how he put into action a brewing interest in humanitarian work with a 2017 trip to Paraguay, and how rapidly that is fostering his growth as a surgeon, a leader, and even a father. 

Dr. Swenning initially became interested in humanitarian work after hearing stories from friends and colleagues about how inspiring it was to provide care to people who otherwise have no means or access to the level of medical care that we have in the US. His active participation in humanitarian work has even improved his performance in other, seemingly unrelated areas, including his time management and organizational skills. He's also appreciative of the opportunity that it creates to be more present, and more appreciative of what we have.

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Todd also offers two simple steps to advance your own interest in humanitarian work:

  • Research - Whether about a suitable partner organization, the location, or the type of work, or whether about your needs to expand your effort through industry or volunteers, do a little research.

  • Reach Out - talk to prior participants who have been on these missions to give you a better insight into the time commitment, the type of resources available and the resources you need to bring.

Most importantly, if humantarian work interests you and is a passion, then start your research this week!

If you’re not familiar with Dr. Todd Swenning, he is actively involved in policy making and advocacy with the Orthopaedic Trauma Association as well as the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.  Dedication to education has resulted in his teaching principles of trauma management and patient advocacy both nationally and internationally.  Research projects in both fracture and trauma management have laid the foundation for his passion for trauma and fracture prevention and preparedness.

Participating in humanitarian work is a perfect example of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.

Financial Literacy - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon who wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 23

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

This week, we are welcoming to the mini-Podcast Dr. James Dahle, a practicing ER physician, and the founder and author of The White Coat Investor. This week, Dr. Dahle talks to us about our own financial literacy and whether we need a financial advisor. Physicians are intelligent enough to learn finance and disciplined enough to follow a good plan, but may not have the interest to do. If this applies to you, then it might be good idea to get a financial advisor. When looking for an advisor, you want to find a a fee-only advisor and you want someone who is going to be a fiduciary for you, who will put your interest first.

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How does he suggest we start practicing financial literacy? By doing the following:

  • Step 1 - Find out how you're paying your financial adviser

  • Step 2 - Find out how much you have or will be paying your adviser annually

Most Importantly, find a few minutes this week to find how and how much you're paying for your financial advice! 

If you’re not familiar with James M. Dahle, MD, FACEP, he graduated from Brigham Young University with a BS in Molecular Biology in 1999 and the University of Utah School of Medicine in 2003. He trained at the University of Arizona Emergency Medicine Residency Program from 2003-2006, and then served four years with the Air Force and the Navy, practicing medicine in an academic institution, a small community hospital, a trauma center and in military facilities on four different continents. He is now a partner with Utah Emergency Specialists, seeing patients in a community hospital ED just South of Salt Lake City.

In residency, he developed an interest in personal finance and investing. In 2011, he started The White Coat Investor, now the most widely-read physician-specific personal finance and investing website in the world with over 900,000 page-views per month. In February 2014, he published a best-selling book, The White Coat Investor, A Doctor's Guide to Personal Finance and Investing. He also runs a successful podcast, videocast, CME conference, newsletter, forum, and a scholarship program giving back to medical students. Most recently, he launched the online course "Fire Your Financial Advisor: A Step by Step Guide to Developing Your Own Financial Plan. His financial articles have appeared in numerous online and printed publications, including ACEP NOW, and he is a sought-after speaker best known for helping physicians and other high-income professionals get a "fair shake" on Wall Street.

Financial Literacy is a perfect example of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.

Expressive Writing - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon that wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 22

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

This week, we are welcoming to the mini-Podcast Dr. David Hanscom, an Orthopedic Surgeon specializing in complex spine problems. This week, Dr. Hanscom talks to us about the technique of expressive writing to help with chronic stress and anxiety. It's important to note that stress and anxiety are part of the unconscious brain which is a million times stronger than the conscious brain. This means that we can't use rational means to mitigate stress and anxiety. Instead, we need to redirect by creating an awareness and some space. This is where writing - the mechanism of writing, not the content itself - comes in, because it offers a degree of separation.  

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How does he suggest we apply the technique of expressive writing? By doing the following:

  • Step 1 - Put your pen to the paper and write with freedom: any random thoughts and emotions as they come to you.

  • Step 2 - Do not spend time analyzing your thoughts. It's just about separation. 

  • Step 3 - After writing, destroy it and do not hold into the writing.

Most importantly, find a few minutes a week to find time for expressive writing even if it's only 30seconds a day and start this week! 

If you’re not familiar with Dr. David Hanscom, he is a board certified orthopedic surgeon specializing in complex spine problems. He's co-founder of “Awake at the Wound,” a process which brings athletic performance principles into the operating room. He's also founder of the Direct your Own Care project (DOC), a structured rehabilitation protocol for chronic pain, and author of Back in Control: A Spine Surgeon’s Roadmap Out of Chronic Pain.

Expressive Writing is a perfect example of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.

PTSD Self-Care Tips - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon that wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 21

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

This week, we are welcoming to the mini-Podcast Dr. Ann Marie Warren,  a licensed psychologist and Associate Investigator of Trauma Research. Dr. Warren talks to us about PTSD and associated self-care tips. We've chosen to talk about PTSD because the description of PTSD extends to people that experience the repeated or extreme traumatic event of others, including healthcare givers and their patients. Depending on how intimately involved someone is, reactions can include: disbelief, shock, sadness, anger vulnerability, fearful, being on edge, difficulty with keeping normal routine, sleeping well and changes in appetite. Dr. Warren gave us a series of self-care tips and strategy to help manage stress from trauma. 

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Which active strategies does she suggest? The following:

1. Talking to others who can offer support and not doing it alone

2. Maintaining self care by getting adequate sleep, healthy eating and doing regular exercise

3. Practicing mind relaxing strategies to reduce stress and process the trauma in a positive way

Most importantly, start creating a plan today and get in the habit of talking to others, self-care and thinking about 'things done right'! 

If you’re not familiar with Dr. Ann Marie Warren, Ph.D., ABPP, she is a licensed psychologist and Associate Investigator of Trauma Research at the Level I Trauma Center at Baylor University Medical Center. She is also a Clinical Assistant Professor at Texas A&M in the Department of Surgery. She has been the principal investigator of several funded research projects and multi-site collaborations pertaining to the psychological aspects of physical injury, including depression, posttraumatic stress, and resilience. She is also interested in the psychological outcomes and rehabilitation of patients with traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries.

The PTSD Self-Care Tips are perfect examples of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.