Positive Self-Talk! - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon who wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 47

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon is just a little better…

In this episode of the mini-podcast, Jeff welcomes Dr. Errin Weisman

Errin is an osteopathic family practice doctor and physician coach. She is also the creator of the website TruthRX’s

How can we expect to perform our best with a negative voice telling us what we’re incapable of and what we can not accomplish? Jeff highlights that he, like many of us, has been driven by negative thoughts that motivated him and pushed him to work harder through the early part of his career. In the long run though, this was not a sustainable strategy. What if you could recognize when this is no longer working for you? What if you could spark that high accomplishment with positive thoughts? 

Errin believes we can. And she says the power is within us to choose who we listen to. 

In limited doses, negative talk can help us. Think of the athlete with the proverbial ‘chip on my shoulder’ attitude. This negative motivational technique can serve us well, AND it has its limitations.  Instead of allowing negativity reign, Errin says we can move forward and grow more by shifting and changing our inner voice to serve us better. 

What does Errin suggest we do to start?

  • Step 1 - Gain Awareness. Take note of what your inner voice is saying - good, bad, or ugly.

  • Step 2 - Develop a positive voice. Pair your negative voice with a positive one to serve you better.

  • Step 3 - Practice! Train to put your positive self-talk into action when you recognize your negative inner voice speaking up.

Most importantly, find your inner advocate! Positive self-talk can dramatically improve our ability to accomplish goals and continue to perform at our best!


20190411_171734_0001 (1).png

Errin Weisman, DO

Errin Weisman, DO is a life coach, podcaster and fierce advocate for wellness in medicine. She faced professional burnout early in her career and speaks openly about about her story in order to help others, particularly female physicians and working moms, know they are not alone. Dr. Weisman wholeheartedly believes to be a healer, you must first fill your own cup. She lives and practices life coaching and medicine in rural Southwestern Indiana, loves her roles as farmer's wife, athlete and mother of three.You can find out more about Dr. Weisman on her podcast Doctor Me First, her website truthrxs.com or hang out with her on IG @truthrxs.


Political Advocacy - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon that wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 16

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

This week, we are welcoming back onto the mini-Podcast Dr. Todd Swenning, Director of Orthopaedic Trauma at Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, California, and Medical Director for the Institute of Clinical Orthopedics and Neurosciences. This week, Dr. Swenning will talk to us about political advocacy, specifically about the importance of becoming more involved in the decision-making process on behalf of our patients, medicine itself, healthcare and surgeons.

todd swenning.jpg

How does he suggest we become more involved? By doing the following:

  • Start by reading about advocacy topics

  • Write a letter on a topic that you're passionate about

  • Next, go to an event with a politician, or a local event or fundraiser, and just get involved

Most importantly, make it part of your routine and practice, and share it with others to see how it grows!

If you’re not familiar with Dr. Todd Swenning, he is actively involved in policy making and advocacy with the Orthopaedic Trauma Association as well as the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.  Dedication to education has resulted in his teaching principles of trauma management and patient advocacy both nationally and internationally.  Research projects in both fracture and trauma management have laid the foundation for his passion for trauma and fracture prevention and preparedness.

Political Advocacy is a perfect example of how surgeons can improve their effectiveness inside and outside of the OR.

Patient Advocacy - Life improvement strategies for the surgeon that wants more ... in 10 minutes - Episode 5

Pump the brakes on your week and take 10 minutes to make your life as a surgeon just a little better…

This week, we are welcoming back onto the mini-Podcast Dr. Todd Swenning, Director of Orthopaedic Trauma at Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, California, and Medical Director for the Institute of Clinical Orthopedics and Neurosciences. Dr. Swenning will talk to us about patient advocacy, specifically about taking an active part in bettering patient care and thereby improving patient satisfaction. 

Todd A. Swenning, MD

Todd A. Swenning, MD

How does he suggest we become the best advocates for our patients day-to-day? By doing the following:

  • Asking yourself, how you can be a better patient advocate and remove your own biases from the conversation

  • Listening objectively and take steps to answer the questions the patient should be asking 

  • Be aware of the concept and think actively about it

  • Afterwards, debrief and think critically about how each interaction went

Practice this, and it will become easier over time and make you a better physician.

If you’re not familiar with Dr. Todd Swenning, he is actively involved in policy making and advocacy with the Orthopaedic Trauma Association as well as the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.  Dedication to education has resulted in his teaching principles of trauma management and patient advocacy both nationally and internationally.  Research projects in both fracture and trauma management have laid the foundation for his passion for trauma and fracture prevention and preparedness.

It is a perfect example of how surgeons can be both effective in the operating room and outside of it.

What is 2nd Victim Syndrome? Surgeon Risk and Treatment?

Dr. Bander is a licensed psychologist and board-certified coach with over 30 years of clinical, teaching, training and coaching experience. Her passion is wellness and creating environments that support healthy behaviors. She is keenly aware that we spend the greatest part of our lives at work – and that our workplaces can promote well-being while improving profitability.

On this podcast, she will explain what 2nd Victim Syndrome is, what are the risk factors, and what are methods of treatment. There is great value for all surgeons to understand this information and to look out for ourselves and our colleagues.